Road Trip Vol. 2: Volcanoes, temples, waterfalls, and LIONS!

It was a feat of human achievement when it came to the amount we did that day, and it was all down to our faithful friend who knows the island like the back of his hand.

Trou-aux-Cerfs
Trou-aux-Cerfs

Willy had mentioned when we saw him during our road trip to Old Mauritius, that the next time he saw us, he would take us to the south-west of the island which was perfect because we were getting worried that we wouldn’t be able to go there without having to stay the night. So, our friend picked us up at 8 and we drove to Trou Aux Cerfs which is a dormant volcano and is pretty much slab-dab in the middle of the island. The road up there was so steep I wasn’t sure if the car would make it, but then I felt like an idiot because when we got the top there were about half a dozen mini-buses. The crater itself was coated in tightly-packed trees which petered off toward the bottom which looked like a very mossy lake. The air was so thick up there that there were clouds in the crater, science is cool, also, as we were so high up, we were almost directly in the middle of the mountains so it was almost a crime not take many, many, panoramic shots.

Mare-aux-Vacoas
Mare-aux-Vacoas

After we had walked around enough, regrouped to go to Grand Bassin which was by Mare Aux Vacoas, which is the largest fresh water lake in the island and nearly 2000 feet above sea level, it’s surrounded by pine trees and was very Group of Seven. After stopping to

Shiva
Shiva

take it all in, we continues to Grand Bassin where the Shivatree temple is. It’s guarded by Shiva and Ganesh (both of whom were still in construction), and they reminded us of ‘The Gates of Argonath’ on the border of Gondor in ‘The Fellowship of the Ring’, they were huge statues but much much more welcoming.

Shivatree Temple
Shivatree Temple

Following the road on still, we arrived at the temple which was on one side of the lake. We walked around the orange offering stools which ran around the perimeter of the lake which was huge and then we weren’t quite sure as to whether or not we could go into the temple, but the Pujari beckoned us in. We left our shoes outside and he told us about the temple and the grounds around it. Legend has it that Shiva took his wife Parvati on a trip to show her the most beautiful places on earth, and with him he took a vial from the river Ganges which he dropped onto Mauritius and that is how Grand Bassin came to be. He then told us about the different rituals and ceremonies which take place there and then took our head between his hands and painted a third eye in between our eyebrows and told us they would show us they would allow us to see the truth and beauty in nature, (considering where we were, this wasn’t a difficult thing to do).

Alexandra Falls
Alexandra Falls

After finding another and smaller tucked away temple, we then headed to Alexandra Falls which is a large but very trickily waterfall at one end of the Black River Gorges National Park. The whole park is completely covered in tress which made the waterfall itself look incredibly white and clear. After taking that in and listening to the sound of the water, we slowly made our way back, trying to find a monkey or two, as there were none at the temple which surprised us, as it is famous for drawing them in. Willy then drove us to the best place to see Black River Gorges, which covers a huge amount of the island, to get to this view we drove higher up still, to Black River Peak which is the highest point on the island and where you can see almost the entire park, as well as the edge of the island from almost all sides.

Cascade de Chamarel!
Cascade de Chamarel!

It was then onwards with our slightly whirlwind-y tour to Chamarel! We stopped on a side of a road to get some pineapple with chili’s to keep us going. The Cascade Chamarel is perfect, the earth under it was bright red and cavernous while the landscape around it was green from the trees with the white waterfall running through the two so we stood there gawking at it for a while… Also, you know the lock bridge in Paris? Where couples go with a padlock and key, lock it onto the bridge and throw it in to Seine? They sort of had the same thing here but with a fence which looked like it had been vandalised and stolen from somewhere else and plonked there, not quite the same thing.

The, lock gate of love?
The, lock gate of love?

We then carried onto Le Terre des Sept Couleurs, which is formed from volcanic soil and mineral oxidation and creates the earth to appear to be many different colours at one time, depending on the light and season. After walking around the natural wonder and stopping for coffee which grew there, we started our decent. Willy drove slowly in order for our heads to adjust to the change in pressure as we had spent pretty much the whole day at a very high altitude and also to give us the chance to take in the views, and after about 45 minutes of driving we arrived at Caesela.

Le terre des sept couleurs
Le terre des sept couleurs

Loums had wanted to go to Caesela from pretty much the moment we arrived in Mauritius, as it is an animal and nature reserve which is also a home to a heard of rescue lions! I was a little bit skeptical at first as I wasn’t sure about how well they were look after, but he were told that they are kept with the keepers from cubs to the age of 1 1/2, then from then to 4, they are introduced in very small doses, to little groups of people until they go into semi-retirement in the safari enclosure. We were in one of those of six, and we were introduced to Jimbo and Izza, Izza was a white lion and Jimbo was brown (we nick-named them Nala and Simba). Izza was the bigger of the two and Himbo was very sweet and playful, the keepers let them play and run around, occasionally feeding them pieces of meat, before we met them we were given wooden batons to keep with us at all times as a mark of respect. The keepers allowed

Izzy (Nala)
Izzy (Nala)

us to stroke them on the condition that each touch was firm and not light, otherwise we would risk making them feel nervous. The more we walked around with them we realised that they really are just big cats (well, duh), but you do forget it when you think of lions, but they climbed trees, play-fought with each other, played with the keepers, such an unforgettable thing to have done and I’m very glad we did it.

When our time with them came to an end, the sun was setting, we regrouped with our friend and drove back to the north into nightfall.